OPEN LETTER:  TO MOMS WHO WANT TO BE HONEST 

We live in a Pinterest, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, Blogging world with so. much. pressure.  We are seeing a million mothers at their best, but we rarely see mothers at their worst. Often, we are not getting the whole story. Think about our mothers that raised us. They didn't have the kind of pressure we have, they went to the park and then got home and checked their answering machine to see who might've called them. They didn't have the temptation of the entire world at their finger tips. We are in a challenging time, because we want to be present for our kids and we don’t want to compare ourselves to others, but if we're telling the truth: it often feels nearly impossible. If you know, you know. 

So we want to invite you on a journey with us. We are addicted to our phones just like you. We stress out about silly things like planning Pinterest-perfect birthday parties, we try to take good photos of our kids and showcase the sweet moments and places we go, we are doing all of this and although it's not all bad, it's not the full story. So we want to be honest: most of time we are just trying to make it through the day... through the kids' meltdowns, the endless chores, the mess, etc.  And we are fighting those mom-guilt feelings that we are we are not good enough. The feelings that want to suck us into a shame storm and isolate us into believing that we are not cut out for this motherhood thing. If you've felt this way before, then now you know - you are not alone. 

If you saw us on social media, at a coffee shop, or at the park, you may think we have it all together and that we are “those moms."  But once again, here's the truth: we don't.  We often feel like we're failing. So we want to say enough is enough, let's unite this culture of mothers... and we want you to join us in our desire for honesty. 

Let's be real about the time, sacrifice and work it takes to make it through the day. Or the amount of time we spend on social media looking at other people's lives, instead of being present in our own lives.  Let's be vulnerable enough to say we often struggle.  

So instead of sitting around and comparing ourselves in motherhood, let's spend more time working on our souls... asking the hard questions of motherhood: did I intentionally look in to my child’s eyes today? Did I listen? Was I kind? Did I try my best? Did I take a minute to practice gratitude? 

Let's applaud each other for the things that matter, let's show our children that life is not about what you do, but who you are becoming … and let's ask ourselves, are we the type of people we want our kids to become?